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Designated Marksman Training

designated marksman training


Overview

Purpose of the Basic Designated Marksman (DM) training program: Utilizing a program of instruction (POI) in precision marksmanship techniques, this 5-day course emphasizes stress shooting, shot placement, angle firing and night firing using various proven methods.

Definition of the Designated Marksman: The DM is an individual with additional training in the fundamentals of marksmanship and observation. He is equipped with a precision optic mounted on his SPR. In support of any military operations, he delivers precision fire on positively identified threats – primarily targets of opportunity that pose a threat to unit personnel. The DM is an additional duty within the unit or team. He is not in a specially organized unit nor is he deployed solely to engage targets.

Fundamental Skills of the DM: Safety, Combat Mindset, Moving, Communicating, Moving Targets, Terminal Ballistics, and Marksmanship, Ballistics, Range and Wind Estimation, Atmospherics, Group Analysis and Zero. If requested, course will also cover using a Data Book, and the SOCOM DM Training Qualification.
The urban application of the DM is to supply precision, on-command direct fire. For this to happen, the Team Leader has to have immediate access to the DM. Given the current rules of engagement (ROE) for potential employment environments, the DM can also give the unit the kind of discriminating direct fire that will limit collateral damage and civilian casualties. For example, in addition to conventional assault fire support, other likely DM missions include: civil disturbance operations, area denial in the defense, and SAR Security Teams.

The DM is NOT a sniper. Although there are some basic similarities, they differ significantly.

Some key differences are Weapon and Ammunition:

The Sniper uses a long range, precision weapon and special ammunition. The DM uses the standard issue Special Purpose Rifle (SPR) rifle equipped with an optic.

The DM uses standard issue ammunition. This important distinction means that—unlike the sniper—the DM’s weapon has not been so specialized as to place him at a disadvantage when performing his primary mission.

Course Outline

Day 1:
Range Estimation, Wind Estimation: 30 min, Outside, Warm-up Exercise
Academics:  Range & Wind Estimation, Aiming & Sight Picture, Trigger Control, Elements of Shooting Positions, Understanding Ballistics & Atmospherics, Effective Use of a Data Book
Lunch: students should bring lunch in order to maximize training time.
Range Time: Optic Alignment, 100 M zero, Grouping, Calling Shots

Day 2:
Range Estimation, Wind Estimation: 30 min, Outside, Warm-up Exercise
Academics:  Reticles, Focal Plane, Milling Targets, Team Firing Techniques, Barricades & Vehicles, Multiple Unknown Distance Targets, Elevated Firing Positions, Range & Wind Estimation, Moving Targets & Leads, Spotting Techniques
Lunch: students should bring lunch in order to maximize training time.
Range Time (100 M and UD Range): Team Firing Techniques, Barricades & Vehicles, Multiple Unknown Distance Targets, Elevated Firing Positions, Range & Wind Estimation, Spotting Techniques

Day 3:
Range Time:  100 M zero, Cold Bore Shot Validation, Multiple Targets at Unknown Distances, Vehicles, Barricades
Lunch: students should bring lunch in order to maximize training time. There will not be an opportunity to leave the training site.
Range Time:  Designated Marksman Scenarios

Day 4:
Classroom: Review of Data Books, Trends, Groupings, Atmospherics
Range Time:  100 M Zero, Grouping, Calling Shots
Lunch: students should bring lunch in order to maximize training time. There will not be an opportunity to leave the training site.
Range Time:  Team Exercises, Single Shooter Challenge

Day 5: 
Full Mission Profiles (Minimum of 3)

Purpose of the Advanced Designated Marksman (DM) training program:
Utilizing a program of instruction (POI) in precision marksmanship techniques, this 3-day course emphasizes intense stress shooting, precision shot placement, extreme high/low-angle firing and predominantly night time firing scenarios. Weapon-mounted thermal optic required for this course. Course will be specifically tailored to meet the needs of your department or agency.

Student Requirements

Equipment:

1.  7.62/308/300WINMAG rifle with optics capable of 800m, and a bipod.

2.   300 rds of match grade ammo

3.   Calculator, mechanical pencils

4.   Mildot Master:  http://www.mildot.com/

5.   Data Book with range cards, ballistic table appropriate for the round being fired,    
unknown distance data sheets: 
http://ustacticalsupply.com/modularsniperdatabooknsn1220-01-547-1801.aspx

            Note: Preassembled data books are available upon request (with 30 day advance notice). These contain all preprinted data pages and ballistics whiz wheel. These can be used in lieu of the Kestral.

6.  Rucksack w/hydration, ammo carrier, shooting mat (optional), gloves, ear/eye pro, and sling (optional) and a cleaning kit.

7. Kestral® w/Ballistic Program:
http://www.nkhome.com/kestrel-products/kestrel-shooters-weather-meter-with-applied-ballistics

8. Shooting Rest Bean Bag: 
http://www.accuracy1stdg.com/store/itemDetail.cfm?prodID=555

9. Accuracy 1st Whiz Wheel:  https://www.accuracy1stdg.com/store/itemDetail.cfm?prodID=497

  1. These need to be pre-ordered so that the correct weapon-specific characteristics can be used in determining DOPE for each shooter.
  2. Eight (8) variables should be identified prior to ordering. These can be used in lieu of the Kestral 4500 if only one model of rifle is being used by your team.

           
10. NOTE: Teams participating should bring radios for each member. Freq’s suitable for inter-team comm should be coordinated prior to attending the course. An additional radio isrequested for the FMP coordinator.

11.  Students attending the Advanced DM course are required to bring a weapon-mounted thermal imaging device.

Prerequisite Academics:

  1. Basic understanding of Mil-Dot and MOA units of measurement: 
    http://www.snipercountry.com/Articles/MilDot_MOA.asp
  2. Use of Data Books:
    http://www.ustacticalsupply.com/databookinstructions.pdf

Pre-course Preparation:

There are a few key items that need to be accomplished prior to the start of the course. These include:

  1. Determine the make and model of your optic.  This is paramount in order to determine which type of reticle you will be using (MOA, MilDot) and whether it is a first or second focal plane optic. With regard to Leupold, the Mark 8, Mark 6, or Mark 4 ER/T's are Front Focal plane. All other models are Rear Focal Plane.  If in doubt, contact the manufacturer and find out ahead of time:
  2. Ensure that the optic is mounted to the rifle and is level.  That is, the horizontal line of the reticle is parallel to the ground.  This should be accomplished using a bubble level.
  3. If you are a member of a unit that is attending, determine whether your service/career field/agency is using meters/mils or yards/moa.  This will greatly simply the learning process which will result in more trigger time and less administrivia.

Get the HANDBOOK

Paul K Koester   Cell: (850) 758-5880

EMAIL: PKGunsmithing@yahoo.com

 

 

 

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PK Gunsmithing
Henderson, Nevada 89074
Call us at: 850-758-5880
pkgunsmithing@yahoo.com